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DSC POWERSERIES 1616 - 1832 - 1864 KEYPAD FAQS

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LCD5511 Icon LCD Keypad

How do I wire the keypad?

PK5500/RFK5500/RFK5564 Full-Message Keypad

What is the difference between a PK and RFK keypad?
What is the difference between a 5501 and a 5500 keypad?
What is the difference between an RFK5500 and an RFK5564?
How do I wire the keypad?

PK5501/RFK5501 Fixed-Message Keypad

What is the difference between a PK and RFK keypad?
What is the difference between a 5501 and a 5500 keypad?
Can I program with a PK5501?
How do I wire the keypad?

PK5508/PK5516 LED Keypad

How do I wire the keypad?

PTK5507 Touchscreen Keypad
Is it easier to program from a PTK5507?
Is there a wireless receiver in the PTK5507?
Will I need an additional power supply to use the PTK5507?
How do I wire the keypad?

 

 

 

 

 

LCD5511 Icon LCD Keypad

 

 

How do I wire the keypad?

Wiring the keypads to the control panels is relatively straightforward. All keypads will connect in parallel with the four keybus terminals: RED, BLK, YEL, GRN. These terminals are named after the standard colors of 22 gauge 4 conductor alarm wire. And each keypad will also have similarly named terminals to match. You can do home runs for each keypad or wire keypads on a single run in parallel with each other.

There’s a couple of rules to keep in mind as well. A single keypad cannot have more than 1000 feet of wire between it and the control panel. And the keybus cannot have more than 3000 feet of wire total. - Back To Top

 

 

 

PK5500/RFK5500/RFK5564 Full-Message Keypad

 

 

What is the difference between a PK and RFK keypad?

The only difference between a keypad beginning with PK compared to the same style beginning with RFK (ex: PK5500 vs. RFK5500) is that the RFK keypads have a built-in 433mHz wireless receivers. This makes them very budget friendly since it is less expensive than buying a PK keypad with a separate wireless receiver module. It is also easier to install since it is one less module to get a wire run to. However, RFK keypads are not ideal for wireless reception as you have to place them in a location that is appropriate for a keypad. In most houses this isn’t an issue, but for larger homes or businesses or other locations that have unique environmental challenges for wireless reception you may want to get a separate module that can be placed in a more ideal location for receiving signals. - Back To Top

 

 

What is the difference between a 5501 and a 5500 keypad?

The 5501 line of keypads is a fixed message style of keypad. This means that screen will only display a specific, predetermined set of symbols and information. Because of this limitation there are a few areas of the system use that are more difficult. One of the biggest is system programming. For a large portion of programming, you will be doing it blind because the keypad has no way to display the information. The exception to that is programming sections with toggle options. The numbers 1 through 8 will be displayed on the screen if the option is on. Another drawback is that you can’t assign custom labels for zones.

The 5500 is a full message keypad. This adds quite a few features: easier programming, the ability to check the event log, custom zone labels, easier trouble condition checking, easier troubleshooting. Overall, the keypad is a much friendlier user experience. We always recommend people having at least one of this style of keypad on their system as it has shown time and time again to help prevent headaches, especially for an inexperienced alarm DIYer. - Back To Top

 

 

What is the difference between an RFK5500 and an RFK5564?

These keypads are almost exactly the same so it can be confusing as to which one to get. As far as the actual user interface for the keypads, they are both the same 5500 full message alphanumeric style. The difference is in the built-in wireless receiver. The RFK5500 has a 32 zone wireless receiver whereas the RFK5564 has a 64 zone wireless receiver. The RFK5564 is only useful if you have a PC1864 control panel. - Back To Top

 

 

How do I wire the keypad?

Wiring the keypads to the control panels is relatively straightforward. All keypads will connect in parallel with the four keybus terminals: RED, BLK, YEL, GRN. These terminals are named after the standard colors of 22 gauge 4 conductor alarm wire. And each keypad will also have similarly named terminals to match. You can do home runs for each keypad or wire keypads on a single run in parallel with each other.

There’s a couple of rules to keep in mind as well. A single keypad cannot have more than 1000 feet of wire between it and the control panel. And the keybus cannot have more than 3000 feet of wire total. - Back To Top

 

 

 

PK5501/RFK5501 Fixed-Message Keypad

 

 

What is the difference between a PK and RFK keypad?

The only difference between a keypad beginning with PK compared to the same style beginning with RFK (ex: PK5500 vs. RFK5500) is that the RFK keypads have a built-in 433mHz wireless receivers. This makes them very budget friendly since it is less expensive than buying a PK keypad with a separate wireless receiver module. It is also easier to install since it is one less module to get a wire run to. However, RFK keypads are not ideal for wireless reception as you have to place them in a location that is appropriate for a keypad. In most houses this isn’t an issue, but for larger homes or businesses or other locations that have unique environmental challenges for wireless reception you may want to get a separate module that can be placed in a more ideal location for receiving signals. - Back To Top

 

 

What is the difference between a 5501 and a 5500 keypad?

The 5501 line of keypads is a fixed message style of keypad. This means that screen will only display a specific, predetermined set of symbols and information. Because of this limitation there are a few areas of the system use that are more difficult. One of the biggest is system programming. For a large portion of programming, you will be doing it blind because the keypad has no way to display the information. The exception to that is programming sections with toggle options. The numbers 1 through 8 will be displayed on the screen if the option is on. Another drawback is that you can’t assign custom labels for zones.

The 5500 is a full message keypad. This adds quite a few features: easier programming, the ability to check the event log, custom zone labels, easier trouble condition checking, easier troubleshooting. Overall, the keypad is a much friendlier user experience. We always recommend people having at least one of this style of keypad on their system as it has shown time and time again to help prevent headaches, especially for an inexperienced alarm DIYer. - Back To Top

 

 

Can I program with a PK5501?

Yes. It is difficult however. For much of the programming you will be doing it ‘blind.’ You’ll just be keeping track close to what you’re entering and listening to the beeps to determine if where you are and if you valid information. You will be able to see toggle options on the keypad which is necessary for a number of common programming sections. One of the biggest reasons that we don’t recommend programming on this style keypad, whether experienced or inexperienced, is that you cannot go back through to check your programming. So if you think you accidentally might have entered a wrong number on one of your zone definitions, you have to go back and reenter all the data. Whereas with a PK5500 keypad, you could go back and scroll through the data and verify and correct as needed. - Back To Top

 

 

How do I wire the keypad?

Wiring the keypads to the control panels is relatively straightforward. All keypads will connect in parallel with the four keybus terminals: RED, BLK, YEL, GRN. These terminals are named after the standard colors of 22 gauge 4 conductor alarm wire. And each keypad will also have similarly named terminals to match. You can do home runs for each keypad or wire keypads on a single run in parallel with each other.

There’s a couple of rules to keep in mind as well. A single keypad cannot have more than 1000 feet of wire between it and the control panel. And the keybus cannot have more than 3000 feet of wire total. - Back To Top

 

 

 

PK5508/PK5516 LED Keypad

 

 

How do I wire the keypad?

Wiring the keypads to the control panels is relatively straightforward. All keypads will connect in parallel with the four keybus terminals: RED, BLK, YEL, GRN. These terminals are named after the standard colors of 22 gauge 4 conductor alarm wire. And each keypad will also have similarly named terminals to match. You can do home runs for each keypad or wire keypads on a single run in parallel with each other.

There’s a couple of rules to keep in mind as well. A single keypad cannot have more than 1000 feet of wire between it and the control panel. And the keybus cannot have more than 3000 feet of wire total. - Back To Top

 

 

 

PTK5507 Touchscreen Keypad

 

 

Is it easier to program from a PTK5507?

Overall it is a little bit easier. The vast majority of the programming will be done through what’s called console mode. A virtual version of the standard 5500 style keypad comes up on the touchscreen display in this mode. So it will function just like the other keypad for programming purposes. Where you will get a benefit is when you go to do your zone labels. The keypad will have an actual touch keyboard on the screen that will make doing those labels much quicker. Normally doing labels is a big time eater on a numeric keypad. - Back To Top


 

 

Is there a wireless receiver in the PTK5507?

There is no wireless receiver built into the PTK5507 touchscreen keypad. You will have to add either another hardwired keypad with a receiver like the RFK5500 or RFK5501 or you’ll add a standalone receiver like the RF5132-433 or a standalone transceiver like the TR5164-433. - Back To Top


 

 

Will I need an additional power supply to use the PTK5507?

The DSC PTK5507 uses 200mA per keypad. The DSC PC1616, PC1832, and PC1864 have a maximum power output of 700mA. You will have to take into consideration all of the other power drawing devices attached into your system.


We recommend to stay at least 10% under the maximum of 700mA. If you’re planning on adding more than that for power drawing devices then you will have to add an additional power supply; the DSC PC5204. The DSC PC5204 is a bare circuit board so you will need the PC5003C cabinet to put it in. A lot of people ask, “Why can’t I put this in the main cabinet?” and we tell them that you’ll need another cabinet because the PC5204 needs its own backup battery and transformer. - Back To Top


 

 

How do I wire the keypad?

Wiring the keypads to the control panels is relatively straightforward. All keypads will connect in parallel with the four keybus terminals: RED, BLK, YEL, GRN. These terminals are named after the standard colors of 22 gauge 4 conductor alarm wire. And each keypad will also have similarly named terminals to match. You can do home runs for each keypad or wire keypads on a single run in parallel with each other.

There’s a couple of rules to keep in mind as well. A single keypad cannot have more than 1000 feet of wire between it and the control panel. And the keybus cannot have more than 3000 feet of wire total. - Back To Top